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Lesson 38

What are you wearing?

Level: Pre-Intermediate
Lessons

Lesson contents:

- Continuation of the Present
   Continuous with clothing
   vocabulary
- Difference between "wear" & "carry"
- Practice with "whose"
- US / UK vocabulary differences:
   pants and underpants
- Loose vs baggy fit
- More US / UK differences:
   panties and knickers
- Questions with "Who" as subject

 

Always watch the video without subtitles first in order to train your ears! It's a good idea to watch several times until you feel the "music", before watching the version with subtitles. Your pronunciation will be much better if you follow this rule.

 

Exercises for this lesson:

 

How to do the lessons:
  1. Watch the video without subtitles.
  2. Do all the Exercises.
  3. Come back to this page.
  4. Watch the video with English Subtitles. Use the Pause button. People speak fast!

 

Problems? See general support, recording support or ask your question here.

What are you wearing?
Watch this video, then click on Exercise 1

 

Same video with Precise Subtitles
Do the exercises before watching this video with subtitles.

 




YouTube

Teachers:

The question enables us to continue practising the Present Continuous, with clothing vocabulary in the replies provided by the interviewees. 15 people are wearing 39 different articles of clothing in this video. They tell us what they are.

Ronaldo Lima, Jr. a brilliant EFL teacher in Brazil, has written on his blog about this particular video. This is part of his conclusion:
In a clothes lesson, when students started describing what they are wearing, I would focus on the quantifiers. If they said "I'm wearing a T-shirt, scarf, hat, shoes and jacket", I would probably correct them and have them say "I'm wearing a scarf, a hat, a pair of shoes and a jacket.

But why, if that's not necessarily how people would say it? With these real-english videos, though, we can, again, expose students to the real language real people use.